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Global EnergyIssues, Potentials, and Policy Implications$
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Paul Ekins, Mike Bradshaw, and Jim Watson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198719526

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 November 2020

Improving efficiency in buildings

Improving efficiency in buildings

conventional and alternative approaches

Chapter:
(p.162) (p.163) 9 Improving efficiency in buildings
Source:
Global Energy
Author(s):

Kathryn B. Janda

Charlie Wilson

Mithra Moezzi

Françoise Bartiaux

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719526.003.0010

This chapter describes selected technical, social, and policy approaches to reducing energy demand. It concentrates mostly on energy reduction in homes and addresses the ways in which energy use is (and is not) problematized. It shows that the framing of the problem affects the types of solutions that researchers and policymakers propose. The chapter begins with a discussion of the conventional positivist approach to energy efficiency policy, in which general solutions are identified through engineering analyses known as conservation supply curves or marginal abatement cost curves. It then discuss a few housing trends which the conventional approach fails to address or explain. These experiences suggest that a more interpretative approach to questions of energy demand may provide additional policy opportunities that the dominant paradigm overlooks. The chapter concludes with possible implications for policies and policymakers resulting from restructuring the underlying assumptions on which most energy efficiency policy is based.

Keywords:   energy demand, barriers, financing, labelling, energy standards, social science, social potential, energy cultures, social practices

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