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Addiction and ChoiceRethinking the relationship$
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Nick Heather and Gabriel Segal

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198727224

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727224.001.0001

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Role of choice biases and choice architecture in behavioral economic strategies to reduce addictive behaviors

Role of choice biases and choice architecture in behavioral economic strategies to reduce addictive behaviors

Chapter:
(p.346) Chapter 19 Role of choice biases and choice architecture in behavioral economic strategies to reduce addictive behaviors
Source:
Addiction and Choice
Author(s):

Jalie A. Tucker

Susan D. Chandler

JeeWon Cheong

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727224.003.0019

Human investment activities are vulnerable to delay discounting and a range of other common choice biases. This chapter summarizes conceptual work and research on choice biases and discusses implications for individual and public health strategies to reduce addictive behaviors, with emphasis on public health. Principles of population science, prevention, and public health practice are summarized to explicate the basis for an integrated intervention strategy, informed by research on human choice behavior, which spans clinical, community, healthcare system, and policy interventions. Interventions may remediate choice biases (e.g. seek to reduce delay discounting) or manipulate the architecture of choice by framing options to help people choose in their best interests (e.g. make the more beneficial choice the default option). Choice architecture strategies implemented within healthcare systems and communities have greater potential for population impact than individual clinical treatments, and what mix of options may maximize population benefits remains to be determined.

Keywords:   choice architecture, biased decision-making, delay discounting, addictive behaviors, public health, behavioral economics

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