Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Addiction and ChoiceRethinking the relationship$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nick Heather and Gabriel Segal

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198727224

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727224.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 31 October 2020

How do you know you have a drug problem? The role of knowledge of negative consequences in explaining drug choice in humans and rats

How do you know you have a drug problem? The role of knowledge of negative consequences in explaining drug choice in humans and rats

Chapter:
(p.29) Chapter 2 How do you know you have a drug problem? The role of knowledge of negative consequences in explaining drug choice in humans and rats
Source:
Addiction and Choice
Author(s):

Hanna Pickard

Serge H. Ahmed

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727224.003.0002

Choice models of addiction raise a stark puzzle. Why, if addicts are able to control their consumption and choose to abstain in many circumstances, do they routinely choose to continue to use despite negative consequences? We delineate four options available to a choice theorist to explain this puzzle with respect to human addicts; describe recent experiments with addicted rats which determine the conditions under which they do and do not choose alternative goods over cocaine and heroin respectively; and consider how this animal research bears on our understanding of the nature of addiction. We conclude by arguing for the importance to addiction research of the popular notion of “denial” which, paradoxically, we can begin to theorize by appeal to animal models: for the puzzle dissolves if addicts do not know that the choice to use is the cause of negative consequences, as rats, given their cognitive limitations, cannot.

Keywords:   addiction, animal models, causal knowledge, choice, compulsion, denial, negative consequences

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .