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Rethinking Cognitive Enhancement$
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Ruud ter Meulen, Ahmed Mohammed, and Wayne Hall

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198727392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727392.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2021

Will cognitive enhancement lead to more well-being? The case of people with disabilities

Will cognitive enhancement lead to more well-being? The case of people with disabilities

Chapter:
(p.234) Chapter 15 Will cognitive enhancement lead to more well-being? The case of people with disabilities
Source:
Rethinking Cognitive Enhancement
Author(s):

Heather Bradshaw

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198727392.003.0015

This chapter argues that we can’t know whether a particular morphological change will be an enhancement until we analyze its impact on the well-being of the specific individual undergoing it and their society. One framework for such analyses is that of morphological identity. This framework is derived from the narratives of people with disabilities who have experienced multiple morphological changes. The chapter explains how an individual’s morphological identity before a morphological change is different from their morphological identity afterward, making well-being comparisons tricky. The chapter gives a practical framework for evaluating these kinds of difficult life choices. This applies to numerous situations of involuntary morphological change such as disability, injury, aging, and medical treatment as well as to voluntary morphological changes such as cognitive enhancement.

Keywords:   cognitive enhancement, human enhancement, morphological change, disability, identity, disability studies, well-being, subjective well-being, objective well-being, morphological identity

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