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Private Banking in EuropeRise, Retreat, and Resurgence$
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Youssef Cassis and Philip L. Cottrell

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780198735755

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198735755.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 July 2021

Golden Age, 1815–1870

Golden Age, 1815–1870

Chapter:
(p.113) Chapter 4 Golden Age, 1815–1870
Source:
Private Banking in Europe
Author(s):

Youssef Cassis

Philip L. Cottrell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198735755.003.0005

The period from 1815 to 1870 was private bankers’ golden age and is discussed in this chapter. Banking activities expanded while competition from the nascent joint stock banks was very limited. The leading houses, above all Rothschild and Baring, established themselves, raising loans for European states and Latin America, primarily in London, and played a part, along with other private bankers, in providing the liquidity that enabled international trade to recover. The mid-nineteenth century was a period of accelerating economic growth throughout Europe and attention is paid to the contrasting experiences of private banking in the Rhineland, France and England on one hand; and to the role played by London merchant banks and the Parisian haute banque in international finance on the other hand.

Keywords:   Rothschilds, Barings, international trade, foreign loans, joint-stock banks

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