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The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871$

Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke and Jeffrey Gale Williamson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198753643

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198753643.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 December 2021

(p.xiii) List of Tables

(p.xiii) List of Tables

Source:
The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

  1. 2.1. Average industrial growth rates (per cent, per annum)16

  2. 2.2. Industrial growth in early members of the ‘modern growth club’ 18

  3. 2.3. The top ten performers by region and period 22

  4. 2.4. Catching-up: industrial growth rate relative to leaders 26

  5. 2.5. Unconditional industrial catching-up 27

  6. 3.1. Russian industrial and GDP growth rates by period, 1860–2010 37

  7. 3.2. Value added by sector in the Imperial Russian economy, 1885 and 1913 38

  8. 3.3. Russian/Soviet national income by final use and sector, 1913–40 44

  9. 3.4. The growth of Soviet GDP, total factor productivity, and factor inputs, 1928–85 48

  10. 3.5. Russian macroeconomic indicators, select years 52

  11. 4.1. GDP per capita in Central Europe (Germany = 100)65

  12. 4.2. Share of manufacturing in industrial, sectoral, and aggregate gross value added (per cent)68

  13. 4.3. Annual growth, gross valued added (per cent)68

  14. 4.4. Modern manufacturing: relative contributions to manufacturing growth (per cent, per annum)71

  15. 4.5. Sectoral composition of labour force (per cent)71

  16. 4.6. Manufacturing gross value added by region (1990 Geary?Khamis dollars)73

  17. 4.7. Economically active population by sector (per cent)76

  18. 4.8. Share of industry in gross value added in 1975 prices (per cent)81

  19. 4.9. The composition of gross industrial value added in current prices (per cent)81

  20. A.4.1. Indices of gross value added (constant 1913 prices, 1913 = 100) 85

  21. A.4.2. Indices of gross value added (constant prices, 1950 = 100) 86

  22. A.4.3. Branch shares in total manufacturing gross value added (per cent)88

  23. 5.1. Real growth rates of Southeast European industry, 1870–193893

  24. 5.2. Sectoral shares in manufacturing output, 1912–38 94

  25. 5.3. Manufacturing growth in Southeast Europe, 1950–2007 (annual rates)97

  26. 5.4. Share of industry in GDP, 1950–2010 97

  27. 5.5. Employment share of industry in former European COMECON states 103

  28. 5.6. Industrial and manufacturing growth in Yugoslavia according to different sources using official and revised data, 1950–88 104

  29. 6.1. Average annual growth rates of GDP and manufacturing 118

  30. 6.2. Industrial employment as a percentage of total employment 120

  31. 6.3. Shares and annual average growth rates of the ‘modern’ sector, 1870–1973 122

  32. (p.xiv) 6.4. Industrial value added per inhabitant: Italy, four Italian macro areas, and selected countries, 1891–1971 (Geary–Khamis 1990 dollars)131

  33. 6.5. Distribution of value added by modern sectors across macro areas 132

  34. 7.1. Long-term trends in Egypt and Turkey, 1870–2010 143

  35. 8.1. Disaggregated trade shares by manufacturing sector, 1880–1930 175

  36. 8.2. Disaggregated trade shares in textiles and metal goods, 1880–1930 176

  37. 8.3. Export and import shares by region, 1880–1940 178

  38. 8.4. Korean exports by sector 185

  39. 8.5. Taiwanese shares of industrial sectors in industry and mining (per cent)188

  40. 8.6. Taiwanese sectoral export shares (per cent)188

  41. 9.1. Comparative growth of industrial output, 1912–2008 198

  42. 9.2. Comparative industrialization: China, India, Japan, and Russia/USSR, 1912–2008 199

  43. 9.3. Chinese exports of manufactures: scale and share of production and overall exports, 1933–2008 200

  44. 9.4. Share of industrial output by region, 1933–2008 200

  45. 9.5. Breakdown of industrial output by ownership, 1933–2008 (per cent)202

  46. 9.6. Number of domestic, privately owned modern factories established, by region and decade, 1841–1915 206

  47. 9.7. Breakdown of industrial output by sector 206

  48. 9.8. Gross output value and employment in manufacturing by type of firm, China proper, 1933 208

  49. 9.9. Inward and outward FDI (US$ billion) 217

  50. 9.10. Real annual growth rates for gross output value, 1952–2008 (per cent)218

  51. 9.11. Sectoral SOE shares and TFP growth, 1998–2007 221

  52. 10.1. Employment in factories (thousands)232

  53. 10.2. Capital formation and the public sector 244

  54. 10.3. Industrial growth, 1951–98 (per cent, per annum)246

  55. 10.4. Trade regulation by type of industry (per cent)247

  56. 10.5. Sectoral growth over the twentieth century (per cent, per annum)248

  57. 10.6. Sources of growth (per cent, per annum)250

  58. 10.7. Manufacturing value added per capita in US dollars, 1998 251

  59. 10.8. Gross fixed capital formation in manufacturing and the share of machinery in industrial output 251

  60. 11.1. Industrial output growth, 1870–2007: Southeast Asia and the rest (per cent, per annum)259

  61. 11.2. Terms of trade volatility in Southeast Asia, 1865–1939 263

  62. 11.3. Population density in Southeast Asia, Japan, and Korea (inhabitants per square kilometre)264

  63. 11.4. Terms of trade bust, 1913–49 (1990 = 100)265

  64. (p.xv) 11.5. Export concentration in Asia around 1900 266

  65. 11.6. Share of exports in GDP, 1901–38 (per cent)266

  66. 11.7. Mean primary schooling enrolment rates in Southeast Asia, 1880–1960 (per cent)272

  67. 11.8. Average years of schooling aged 25–64, 1960–2010 274

  68. 12.1. Mexico: manufacturing indicators 292

  69. 12.2. Peru: manufacturing indicators 293

  70. 12.3. Mexico and Peru: manufacturing structure, 1929–2010 298

  71. 12.4. Mexico: macroeconomic variables 304

  72. 12.5. Peru: macroeconomic variables 305

  73. 13.1. Industrial GDP growth rates, South America vs global leaders (per cent, per annum, annual averages)320

  74. 13.2. Convergence/divergence among South American nations and the developed country leaders 321

  75. 13.3. Average labour productivity growth rate: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and the United States 323

  76. 13.4. Population, urbanization and illiteracy rates (per cent), and transportation infrastructure: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Colombia, 1900–2000 324

  77. 13.5. Industrial value added by type of industry, Brazil and Colombia, 1940–95 (per cent)331

  78. 14.1. Manufacturing output in context for selected African countries, 1960 (US 1964 dollars)353

  79. 14.2. Volume index of manufacturing production in the Belgian Congo, 1939–57 (1947–9 = 100)358

  80. 14.3. Industrial production in Belgium and the Belgian Congo, 1957 359

  81. 14.4. Aggregate annual average growth rates of industry and manufacturing in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1961–2000 363

  82. 14.5. Average annual growth rate of manufacturing output (per cent)364

(p.xvi)