Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Globalization and Domestic PoliticsParties, Elections, and Public Opinion$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jack Vowles and Georgios Xezonakis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198757986

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Globalization and Domestic Politics

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Globalization and Domestic Politics
Author(s):
Jack Vowles, Georgios Xezonakis
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.003.0001

This introductory chapter begins by highlighting the importance of globalization to the understanding of domestic politics, and discusses the definition and operationalization of globalization and the extent of its association with deindustrialization. It outlines the normative and empirical elements of the two main theories about the effects of globalization on domestic politics: constraint or efficiency theory, and compensation theory, and their affinities with neo‐liberalism and social democracy respectively. It summarizes the book’s main research questions: Do parties present policy choices differently as a result of globalization? Do voters make their party choices differently as a result of globalization? And how does globalization affect system support? The chapter explains the theoretical basis of the expectations about how globalization affects political parties, citizens’ political behaviour, and public opinion, and discuss the methodological approach. It concludes with a brief summary of the content of the following chapters.

Keywords:   globalization, constraint theory, compensation theory, neo‐liberalism, social democracy, political parties, public opinion, political behaviour, methodology, system support

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .