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Globalization and Domestic PoliticsParties, Elections, and Public Opinion$
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Jack Vowles and Georgios Xezonakis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198757986

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.235) 12 Conclusion
Source:
Globalization and Domestic Politics
Author(s):
Georgios Xezonakis, Jack Vowles
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.003.0012

This chapter first restates the book’s principle aims. Summarizing the findings of previous chapters, on the ‘demand side’ it finds no evidence for a ‘representation deficit’ as a result of globalization nor a shift towards valence politics. On the ‘supply side’ in some but not all societies, globalization shifts party positions rightward. The effects of globalization on the median voter are, however, unclear. Are voters policy‐takers, taking their cues from elites, or policymakers, through whom the effects of globalization are transmitted to elites? We report conflicting findings, indicating the need for more research. Meanwhile, government accountability remains as strong as ever under the condition of globalization. There are no negative effects on satisfaction with democracy, or political efficacy except, in the latter case, those generated by elite cues uncorrelated with the extent of globalization. However, there is slightly lower satisfaction with democracy and lower turnout among potential ‘losers’.

Keywords:   globalization, supply side, demand side, representation, accountability

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