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Globalization and Domestic PoliticsParties, Elections, and Public Opinion$
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Jack Vowles and Georgios Xezonakis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198757986

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 November 2021

Globalization, Positional and Valence Politics, and the Global Financial Crisis

Globalization, Positional and Valence Politics, and the Global Financial Crisis

Chapter:
(p.69) 4 Globalization, Positional and Valence Politics, and the Global Financial Crisis
Source:
Globalization and Domestic Politics
Author(s):
Jack Vowles, Georgios Xezonakis
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198757986.003.0004

Recent research suggests that globalization could be a factor that undermines economic voting and the salience of the left–right economic dimension for individual voting decisions. But the claim that the effects of ideology are reduced by globalization remains contestable. If ideology is in decline, this suggests that voters will compensate by weighting more their attitudes on non‐economic ideological dimensions or their partisanship. Extending this logic, if voting on the economy and the left–right dimension is reduced, broader ‘valence’ issues should come to the fore: evaluations of government performance and competence primarily expressed around leadership preferences. We explore our hypotheses with data from Module 3 of the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems, from elections conducted both before and after the global financial crisis.

Keywords:   globalization, left‐right, valence issues, leadership, economic voting, economic voting, economic voting, government competence, global financial crisis

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