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Rising China's Influence in Developing Asia$
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Evelyn Goh

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198758518

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198758518.001.0001

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China’s Influence on Asian States During the Creation of the UN Human Rights Council: 2005–2007

China’s Influence on Asian States During the Creation of the UN Human Rights Council: 2005–2007

Chapter:
(p.237) 11 China’s Influence on Asian States During the Creation of the UN Human Rights Council: 2005–2007
Source:
Rising China's Influence in Developing Asia
Author(s):

Rosemary Foot

Rana Siu Inboden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198758518.003.0011

This chapter investigates how China used its influence with developing states from Asia to achieve its objectives during the negotiations to replace the UN Commission on Human Rights with a new Human Rights Council in 2005–7. It tests a range of Chinese influence tools—coercion, discursive persuasion, structural power and institutional authority in agenda-setting. It finds that in negotiations over membership criteria, election processes, size, the organizational status of the Council, and the geographical redistribution of seats, the views of other Asian countries represented on the Council were already closely aligned with PRC preferences and China’s influence operated through preference multiplying. However, China did not get support for its preferred position in reference to a controversial proposal to restrict the introduction of country-specific resolutions, where other Asian states were reluctant to oppose directly a number of key (mainly Western European) countries.

Keywords:   China, developing Asian states, human rights, discursive persuasion, structural power, agenda-setting, preference multiplying, United Nations, UNHRC

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