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Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek ReligionVolume I: Early Greek Religion$
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Andrej Petrovic and Ivana Petrovic

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198768043

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198768043.001.0001

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Xenophanes on Good Thinking while Drinking

Xenophanes on Good Thinking while Drinking

Chapter:
(p.103) 5 Xenophanes on Good Thinking while Drinking
Source:
Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion
Author(s):

Andrej Petrovic

Ivana Petrovic

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198768043.003.0006

Chapter 5 concerns Xenophanes of Colophon, c. 570–467 BC. It discusses Fr. B 1 DK, a sympotic elegy which focuses on ritual purity and euphemia. By providing precise instructions for the hymns (‘the men who are of well-disposed mind should first hymn the god, with religiously correct tales and purified words’, vv. 13–14), Xenophanes stresses that one’s mental attitude during religious celebrations should be in keeping with eusebeia. The final verse (v. 24) focuses on the good mental attitude one should always have about the gods (promethie agathe). Even though Xenophanes does not expressly qualify the mind or soul of the worshippers as pure, he stresses the importance of the correct, pious mental attitude. In Xenophanes we find a convergence of appropriate and pure ritual action, euphemia, justice as object of prayer, and a well-disposed mind of the worshipper.

Keywords:   Xenophanes, symposium, rituals, libations, purification, pure speech, logos, mythos, euphemia, euphroneia

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