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Milton in the Long Restoration$
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Blair Hoxby and Ann Baynes Coiro

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198769774

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198769774.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 January 2022

Yet Once More

Yet Once More

Milton’s Lyric Descendants

Chapter:
(p.224) 12 Yet Once More
Source:
Milton in the Long Restoration
Author(s):

Christopher R. Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198769774.003.0013

This chapter examines how Milton, celebrated as an epic poet, became a presiding muse of lyric poetry during a period when the generic category of lyric came to be expanded in scope and elevated in literary prestige. It argues for the formal and thematic influence of Milton’s companion-poems, L’Allegro and Il Penseroso, as models for the eighteenth-century ‘great ode’. In particular, Milton’s concern with voluntary choice and eudaimonia in those poems was reborn in the eighteenth-century vogue for what might be called the poetry of health—a poetry concerned with the well-being of both body and mind, both poet and poetic tradition. The chapter traces that concern in the works of Anne Finch, John Pomfret, Thomas Parnell, Joseph Warton, William Collins, and Mark Akenside.

Keywords:   lyric, ode, health, L’Allegro/Il Penseroso, Alexander Pope, Anne Finch, William Collins, Joseph Wharton, Mark Akenside

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