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Milton in the Long Restoration$
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Blair Hoxby and Ann Baynes Coiro

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198769774

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198769774.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 16 May 2022

Milton and the Restoration Literae

Milton and the Restoration Literae

Chapter:
(p.302) 16 Milton and the Restoration Literae
Source:
Milton in the Long Restoration
Author(s):

Nicholas von Maltzahn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198769774.003.0017

The great poems Milton published in the Restoration have long been scrutinized for evidence of Milton’s politics, but other works he published between 1667 and his death in 1674 can be at least as revealing of his lasting commitments. One of those, which he brought to the press in 1674 but of which publication was denied by the government, amounted to a bold affirmation of Milton’s revolutionary legacy: his State Letters, or Literae. Two years later, the work was printed posthumously and on the Continent, to the chagrin of the Restoration regime. Literae richly displays Milton’s rhetorical service to English liberties, political, religious, and commercial. Written in the 1650s, the book’s Restoration publication marks no friendly voice responding to Stuart rule. Moreover, with at least a dozen editions of these State Letters in this period, in one form or another, they are the most republished then of Milton’s works.

Keywords:   Milton, Literae, state letters, republic, Restoration, liberty, commercial, secretary, sonnets

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