Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Divine CartographiesGod, History, and Poiesis in W. B. Yeats, David Jones, and T. S. Eliot$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

W. David Soud

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198777779

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198777779.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 November 2021

Afterword

Afterword

Chapter:
(p.217) Afterword
Source:
Divine Cartographies
Author(s):

W. David Soud

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198777779.003.0005

The book’s brief afterward begins by reaffirming how a religious orientation, especially one that is grounded in an established tradition and affirms an experiential sense of the sacred, exerts an unavoidable shaping force on a poet’s thought. It goes on to revisit the difficulties of incorporating this ‘transhuman dimension’ of a poet’s work into a rigorous critical conversation. After brief discussions of how far the theologies of Eliot and especially Yeats and Jones have impacted on their legacies, the afterword closes by suggesting how the sort of interdisciplinary research this book exemplifies might apply to contemporary poets, including Geoffrey Hill, Susan Howe, and Anne Carson, as well as some of their theologically minded predecessors, such as W. H. Auden, R. S. Thomas, and Robert Duncan.

Keywords:   Eliade, Yeats, Eliot, Jones, theology, genealogy, sacred, profane, criticism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .