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The Globalization of HateInternationalizing Hate Crime?$
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Jennifer Schweppe and Mark Austin Walters

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198785668

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198785668.001.0001

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Covered in Stigma? Exploring the Impacts of Islamophobic Hate Crime on Veiled Muslim Women Globally

Covered in Stigma? Exploring the Impacts of Islamophobic Hate Crime on Veiled Muslim Women Globally

Chapter:
(p.111) 7 Covered in Stigma? Exploring the Impacts of Islamophobic Hate Crime on Veiled Muslim Women Globally
Source:
The Globalization of Hate
Author(s):

Irene Zempi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198785668.003.0008

In the current climate, the niqab (face veil) is stigmatized as a ‘threat’ on multiple levels, including notions of gender equality, integration, national security, and public safety. Despite their vulnerability to Islamophobic hate crime attacks, veiled Muslim women remain a relatively ‘invisible’ population. Drawing from qualitative data elicited through a UK-based study, this chapter sheds light on the lived experiences of veiled Muslim women as victims of Islamophobic hate crime in the UK and elsewhere. The chapter examines the effects of this victimization upon veiled Muslim women and the wider Muslim community. The individual and collective impacts associated with this victimization are explored through notions of a worldwide, transnational Muslim community, the ummah. Ultimately, this chapter demonstrates the global dynamic of Islamophobic hate crime and the vulnerability of veiled Muslim women as actual and potential victims to the violence it gives rise.

Keywords:   Islamophobic hate crime, veil, Muslim women, victimization, stigmatization

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