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Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Volume 4$
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Robert Pasnau

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198786368

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198786368.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 02 December 2021

Reconstructing Aquinas’s World

Reconstructing Aquinas’s World

Themes from Brower

Chapter:
(p.184) Reconstructing Aquinas’s World
Source:
Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Volume 4
Author(s):

Thomas M. Ward

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198786368.003.0008

This article focuses on some topics in Jeffrey Brower’s recent and excellent book, Aquinas’s Ontology of the Material World: Change, Hylomorphism, and Material Objects. Part of Brower’s goal for the book is to reconstruct Aquinas’s views. I offer some reflections on Brower’s use of this metaphor of reconstruction, before considering four topics in some detail. These are: 1. Brower’s discussion of the relation between Aristotle’s Ten Categories and the not-obviously-connected four-fold division of being into substance, form, prime matter, and accidental unity. 2. Brower’s interpretation of prime matter as “non-individual stuff.” 3. Brower’s account of numerical sameness without identity along with some discussion of how this is supposed to be useful for solving a particular puzzle about accidental change. 4. I’ll close with some reflections on Brower’s somewhat novel solution to a longstanding problem with Aquinas’s metaphysics of the afterlife.

Keywords:   Aquinas, hylomorphism, metaphysics, being, Categories, change, afterlife, Jeffrey Brower

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