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National Capitalisms, Global Production NetworksFashioning the Value Chain in the UK, US, and Germany$
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Christel Lane and Jocelyn Probert

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199214815

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199214815.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 01 December 2021

The Regulation of Labour Standards/Rights in Supplier Countries: The Role of Firms, Nation States, and International Organizations

The Regulation of Labour Standards/Rights in Supplier Countries: The Role of Firms, Nation States, and International Organizations

Chapter:
(p.256) 10 The Regulation of Labour Standards/Rights in Supplier Countries: The Role of Firms, Nation States, and International Organizations
Source:
National Capitalisms, Global Production Networks
Author(s):

Christel Lane (Contributor Webpage)

Jocelyn Probert (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199214815.003.0010

This chapter starts by examining the labour standards and rights which exist in low-wage supplier countries and the role played by national institutions — particularly the state and unions, but also firms — in either strengthening or, more often, undermining them. The analysis focuses on the shortcomings of existing regulatory regimes in three sourcing countries: China, Mexico, and Turkey. The chapter additionally reviews the regulatory regimes adopted under initiatives by inter-governmental organizations, firms, industry associations, unions, and NGOs, singly or in transnational advocacy networks, to improve labour rights and standards in supplier countries and firms. It shows that because western firms' sourcing practices are complicit in causing the poor labour standards suppliers adopt, implementation and monitoring of the observance of labour standards and rights are highly problematic. Finally, the chapter indicates what kind of international regulatory regime might be effective in the future.

Keywords:   labour standards, labour rights, regulatory regimes, transnational advocacy networks, NGOs, international organizations, China, Turkey, Mexico, unions

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