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Micro/Nano Technology Systems for Biomedical ApplicationsMicrofluidics, Optics, and Surface Chemistry$
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Chih-Ming Ho

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199219698

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199219698.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 November 2021

Ewod Droplet Microfluidic Devices Using Printed Circuit Board Fabrication

Ewod Droplet Microfluidic Devices Using Printed Circuit Board Fabrication

Chapter:
(p.232) 6 Ewod Droplet Microfluidic Devices Using Printed Circuit Board Fabrication
Source:
Micro/Nano Technology Systems for Biomedical Applications
Author(s):

Chang‐Jin ‘CJ’ Kim

Jian Gong

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199219698.003.0006

The handling of fluids as discrete packets is a promising notion in microscale, led by droplet-based (aka digital) microfluidics operated by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation. While most current EWOD chips use a series of electrode pads in one-dimensional (1-D) lines designed for specific tasks, the desired universal chips would require user-reconfigurable paths in 2-D array. To address the high cost of fabricating multiple conductive lines necessary for such 2-D chips, the mature printed circuit board (PCB) technology has recently been exploited. Since the as-fabricated PCB surfaces require high voltages to move droplets (~500 V for water) unless a secondary fluid (e.g., oil) is used, various post-processing techniques have been developed. Four types of post-PCB microfabrication process are reported to meet the varying levels of device performances. The best showed driving voltage of ~55 V and a droplet speed of ~13 mm/s even without the use of oil.

Keywords:   electrowetting, electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD), droplet microfluidics, digital microfluidics, printed circuit board fabrication, lab on a chip

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