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Global CompetitionLaw, Markets, and Globalization$
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David Gerber

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199228225

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228225.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 July 2021

Competition Law in Europe: Market, Community, and Integration

Competition Law in Europe: Market, Community, and Integration

Chapter:
(p.159) 6 Competition Law in Europe: Market, Community, and Integration
Source:
Global Competition
Author(s):

David J. Gerber

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228225.003.0006

This chapter outlines European national experience as well as the evolution and dynamics of competition law in the European Union. European competition law experience is particularly important for two reasons. One is that European national competition law systems have developed under circumstances that have often been similar to those faced in many countries that seek to develop competition law in the 21st century. The other reason is that for decades, European national competition laws have developed within the context of European integration, and this national—transnational experience highlights key issues in the development of competition law for global markets. The European model of competition law features a central role for administrative decision making and an emphasis on combating the use of private economic power to restrict competition. Over the last decade, some elements of the European model have moved toward the US view of competition law.

Keywords:   Europe, integration, European model, national competition laws, community, European Union, abuse of power, administrative centrality

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