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Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law$
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Brad Roth

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243013

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243013.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 July 2021

International Politics, International Law, and the Legitimacy of Domestic Governments

International Politics, International Law, and the Legitimacy of Domestic Governments

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One International Politics, International Law, and the Legitimacy of Domestic Governments
Source:
Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law
Author(s):

Brad R. Roth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243013.003.0001

This chapter discusses how governmental illegitimacy arises as an issue in international relations and international law. International reaction to the 1991–1994 Haitian crisis is only the most prominent in a series of events that suggest that a norm of governmental illegitimacy is emerging to challenge more traditional notions of state sovereignty. The chapter also seeks to determine the extent to which a norm of popular sovereignty has displaced the protections that international law has traditionally accorded de facto authorities; the extent of that norm's relationship to liberal-democratic principles of government; and the legal implications of this development for multilateral interventions in the internal affairs of the states.

Keywords:   governmental illegitimacy, international relations, international law, Haitian crisis, state sovereignty

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