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Defining ShakespearePericles as Test Case$
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MacDonald P. Jackson

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199260508

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199260508.001.0001

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Identifying the Author of Pericles, Acts 1 and 2

Identifying the Author of Pericles, Acts 1 and 2

Chapter:
(p.80) Chapter Four Identifying the Author of Pericles, Acts 1 and 2
Source:
Defining Shakespeare
Author(s):

MACD. P. JACKSON

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199260508.003.0004

This chapter attempts to identify the author of Pericles, Acts 1 and 2. George Wilkins, Thomas Heywood, John Day, William Rowley, George Chapman, Thomas Dekker, and Thomas Middleton have all been proposed as candidates of co-authorship, but Wilkins is the only one of these for whose association with Pericles, Acts 1-2, evidence of any worth has been brought forward. Wilkins is known to have been the author of just one unaided play, The Miseries of Enforced Marriage, published two years before Pericles, in 1607. Attribution studies are most persuasive when a variety of approaches all converge on the same conclusion. The chapter details findings which cover versification, rhymes, high-frequency words, stylistic quirks, linguistic forms, uses of the relative pronoun, and verbal parallels. Statistics are complemented by stylistic analysis along conventional literary-critical lines.

Keywords:   Pericles, George Wilkins, Thomas Heywood, John Day, William Rowley, George Chapman, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton, stylistic quirks, attribution studies

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