Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Nation & NovelThe English Novel from its Origins to the Present Day$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Patrick Parrinder

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199264858

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199264858.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 01 December 2021

Conclusion: On Englishness and the Twenty-First-Century Novel

Conclusion: On Englishness and the Twenty-First-Century Novel

Chapter:
(p.406) Conclusion: On Englishness and the Twenty-First-Century Novel
Source:
Nation & Novel
Author(s):

Patrick Parrinder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199264858.003.0017

The chapter discusses the thesis that what constitutes the Englishness of the novels is highly dependent on the changing circumstances. Literariness of the English fiction may be attributed to postmodernism. Other circumstances that have affected it include the changing national politics and economy. As reflected in the immigration novels, Woolf describes the English population as identity boxes since they comprise a mixture of different cultural, gender, regional, and ethnic identities. The chapter ends with the optimism that novelists of the 21st century will continue to write about nationhood and play an important role in the continuous formation of English identity.

Keywords:   literariness, Englishness, novel, English fiction, identity boxes, postmodernism, immigration novels, Woolf, national politics

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .