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Pope John XXII and his Franciscan CardinalBertrand de la Tour and the Apostolic Poverty Controversy$
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Patrick Nold

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199268757

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199268757.001.0001

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Pope John XXII

Pope John XXII

Chapter:
(p.140) 8 Pope John XXII
Source:
Pope John XXII and his Franciscan Cardinal
Author(s):

PATRICK NOLD

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199268757.003.0008

This chapter begins by examining the figure apparently caught in the middle of such conflict: the Franciscan Cardinal, Bertrand de la Tour. It focuses on investigating Pope John XXII's personal background. It assesses John's education and whether he had any theological training. It also presents evidence on the reaction of Pope John XXII to the Chapter General. It talks about how John continued his explanation of how the retention domini arrangement had harmed the Franciscans' state of perfection. It ends where the apostolic poverty controversy begins. It clarifies the idea that the Papacy, in the person of Pope John XXII, originally opposed the notion of papal infallibility cannot be substantiated by a thorough analysis of the evidence of the controversy over apostolic poverty.

Keywords:   Bertrand de la Tour, Quia nonnumquam, Pope John XXII, Chapter General, Ad Conditorem, apostolic poverty

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