Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Mismanagement of TalentEmployability and Jobs in the Knowledge Economy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Phillip Brown, Anthony Hesketh, and Sarah Williams

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199269532

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269532.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 November 2020

The Great Training Robbery 1

The Great Training Robbery 1

Chapter:
(p.215) 9 The Great Training Robbery1
Source:
The Mismanagement of Talent
Author(s):

Phillip Brown

Anthony Hesketh

Sara Williams

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269532.003.0009

Despite the efforts of individuals to attain higher education and the increasing demand for knowledge workers in the new economy, there are not enough high skilled and high wage jobs to accommodate those who are qualified for such positions. Because of changing market conditions, there is no guarantee that all highly qualified graduates will be able to land a regular job that will best suit their abilities. In such cases, and with the advent of globalisation and migration, mass higher education will only contribute to costs and industrial competitiveness rather than becoming part of the solution to a much broader problem. Success in the job market is thus based not only on one's hard and soft currencies but also on the employability of others.

Keywords:   higher education, globalisation, employability, competition, market conditions

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .