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The Politics of the PoorThe East End of London 1885-1914$
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Marc Brodie

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199270552

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270552.001.0001

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A House Divided

A House Divided

Chapter:
(p.44) 2 A House Divided
Source:
The Politics of the Poor
Author(s):

MARC BRODIE

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199270552.003.0003

This chapter attempts to put into context the electoral evidence from the East End constituencies in this period. It shows that that voting patterns in the East End should be seen as more closely representative of the views of the most prosperous within each area of East London. But there was also an overall consistency across areas in the economic circumstances of voters, which suggests that the obvious variations in electoral results between constituencies or wards may be best explained by localized or other factors rather than broad economic or class circumstances. This is further emphasized by the shorter time that voters remained on the registers in this period, particularly a significant group of poorer voters who gained the vote quite late in age. This suggests, as well, that politics in the Victorian and Edwardian East End should be considered clearly in the context of a much more tenuous level of party allegiance.

Keywords:   economic circumstances, East End, constituencies, voting patterns

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