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Human Rights and DevelopmentTowards Mutual Reinforcement$
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Philip Alston and Mary Robinson

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199284627

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199284627.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 06 December 2021

What Rights Can Add to Good Development Practice

What Rights Can Add to Good Development Practice

Chapter:
(p.25) 3 What Rights Can Add to Good Development Practice
Source:
Human Rights and Development
Author(s):

Mary Robinson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199284627.003.0003

This chapter starts by defining what poverty means. It sketches the situation of global poverty and some of the factors that have exacerbated it. It also discusses recent progress made by the international community in bringing human rights into the discussion of development. It then describes in a little more detail some of the reasons why many development and economics specialists still remain critical of the human rights approach. Three principal criticisms of the human rights approach are cited by those who work in the field of development. In general, there is gathering evidence of mutual need. The evaluation of progress on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to be carried out in 2005, and the debate in the General Assembly in September 2005, offers an ideal context for the further convergence for those working in the fields of human rights and development.

Keywords:   global poverty, human rights, development practice, Millennium Development Goals

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