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Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile$
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Andrew Mein

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199291397

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291397.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 November 2021

The ‘Domestication’ of Ethics

The ‘Domestication’ of Ethics

Chapter:
(p.177) 6 The ‘Domestication’ of Ethics
Source:
Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile
Author(s):

Andrew Mein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291397.003.0007

This chapter examines two oracles which appear to be directly addressed to the community of exiles: 14: 1–11 and 18: 1–32. In both of these oracles, there are prominent themes that suggest that the range of moral options open to the group has become limited by comparison with their former life in Judah. One of the most distinctive features of Ezekiel's prophecy is his reapplication of legal forms to theological issues, which is most evident in 14: 1–11 and chapter 18. It is in these two oracles that we find most clearly stated a call to repentance. A closer examination of the texts reveals that while repentance is not significant in Ezekiel's prediction of the fall of Jerusalem, nor in his promises of future restoration, it is directed towards the present experience of exile, and shows Yaweh's continuing concern that his people should act rightly even in exile.

Keywords:   exile, Judah, oracles, legal forms, repentance, Jerusalem

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