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Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds$
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Lorna Hardwick and Carol Gillespie

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199296101

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199296101.001.0001

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‘If You are a Woman’: Theatrical Womanizing in Sophocles’ Antigone and Fugard, Kani, and Ntshona’s The Island

‘If You are a Woman’: Theatrical Womanizing in Sophocles’ Antigone and Fugard, Kani, and Ntshona’s The Island

Chapter:
(p.211) 12‘If You are a Woman’: Theatrical Womanizing in Sophocles’ Antigone and Fugard, Kani, and Ntshona’s The Island
Source:
Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds
Author(s):

Rush Rehm

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199296101.003.0013

This chapter discusses another post-colonial text that has in its turn become part of the western canon, Athol Fugard’s The Island. The chapter approaches the play via questions about the representation of women. It anchors the discussion in the text of Sophocles’s Antigone and, in so doing, sheds light on why Sophocles is so frequently the author of choice, not only for post-colonial theatre but also for rewritings, in what the chapter argues are continually colonial contexts. The chapter shows how in The Island, Winston enters a Sophoclean world in which political resistance and theatrical womanising are inextricably linked, and where political struggle has to engage with and include what seems weakest, precisely in order to test its convictions and strength.

Keywords:   Athol Fugard, post-colonial literature, theatre, literary canon, The Island, Sophocles, Antigone, political resistance, womanising

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