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Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds$
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Lorna Hardwick and Carol Gillespie

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199296101

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199296101.001.0001

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Cross-Cultural Bonds Between Ancient Greece and Africa: Implications for Contemporary Staging Practices

Cross-Cultural Bonds Between Ancient Greece and Africa: Implications for Contemporary Staging Practices

Chapter:
(p.72) 4 Cross-Cultural Bonds Between Ancient Greece and Africa: Implications for Contemporary Staging Practices
Source:
Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds
Author(s):

John Djisenu

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199296101.003.0005

Cross-cultural bonds exist between Africa and ancient Greece that have inspired some African playwrights to model their dramas on Greek mythological plays. A number of African playwrights currently fashion their own works from indigenous myths, using the performance technique of recontextualisation as the fundamental method in contemporary staging of mythology. One of these cross-cultural bonds is the existence and use of myths in African societies. Another is polytheism; the recurring features of myths and gods are known to be close bedfellows in both African and ancient Greek cultures. The third cross-cultural bond has to do with curses and fatalism. Apart from the commonalities of myths, polytheism, and curses, other cross-cultural bonds exist. Consider the use of spectacle, where ancient Greek dramas employ music, rhythm, dance or movements, and ritualistic elements.

Keywords:   ancient Greece, cross-cultural bonds, Africa, theatre, myths, polytheism, curses, fatalism, spectacle, dance

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