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Enhancing Cancer CareComplementary therapy and support$
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Jennifer Barraclough

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199297559

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297559.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 November 2020

Exercise

Exercise

Chapter:
(p.141) Chapter 13 Exercise
Source:
Enhancing Cancer Care
Author(s):

Margaret L Mcneely

Kerry S Courneya

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199297559.003.0013

Increasing attention has been directed towards survivorship issues for individuals diagnosed with cancer. Preliminary research has shown that appropriately prescribed exercise training programs are associated with low complication rates and numerous beneficial effects. On the basis of current evidence, the American Cancer Society recommends that cancer survivors participate in regular physical activity. This chapter provides an overview of exercise as an intervention in the rehabilitation of cancer patients and cancer survivors and includes recommendations for exercise programming based on research evidence and clinical experience. First, it provides definitions and benefits of physical activity and exercise, and then discusses common side effects from cancer treatment that may require consideration prior to exercise testing and programming. It also considers exercise prescription options for the post-cancer treatment rehabilitation phase, including cardiorespiratory exercise training, resistance exercise training, and flexibility training. Finally, precautions and contraindications to exercise are discussed.

Keywords:   exercise, cancer survivors, cancer, physical activity, rehabilitation, cancer patients, side effects, cancer treatment, flexibility training, cardiorespiratory exercise training

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