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Out of ObscurityMormonism since 1945$
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Patrick Q. Mason and John G. Turner

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199358212

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199358212.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 September 2021

Housework

Housework

The Problem that does have a Name

Chapter:
(p.198) 9 Housework
Source:
Out of Obscurity
Author(s):

Kate Holbrook

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199358212.003.0010

In the decades following the Second World War, Americans proposed two main solutions to the distaste many women felt for housework. Some, including second-wave feminists, asserted that women would find greater happiness if freed from housework in order to create space for their vocational and other pursuits. Others suggested that women would find happiness by securing the contentment of their husbands, and that they could best do so by disregarding their own antipathy toward domestic drudgery. At first, Mormon women voiced some support for both of these approaches, while at the same time regarding housework as a sacred opportunity to nurture family members. Changes in the Relief Society curriculum during these decades illustrate a transition from practical depictions of housekeeping to the romanticization of women’s relationship with housework.

Keywords:   Mormon, Latter-day Saint, second-wave feminism, feminism, housework, Relief Society

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