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The Independence of ScotlandSelf-government and the Shifting Politics of Union$
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Michael Keating

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199545957

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199545957.001.0001

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The Strange Death of Unionist Scotland

The Strange Death of Unionist Scotland

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 The Strange Death of Unionist Scotland
Source:
The Independence of Scotland
Author(s):

Michael Keating (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199545957.003.0003

Support for the old Union is falling in Scotland. This is part of a general restructuring of states in Europe, with the emergence and re-emergence of sub-state territories. The old territorial management formula, based on redistribution from the centre, no longer holds. Class solidarities no longer favour the Union. Scots increasingly identify primarily with their nation rather than the United Kingdom. The governing class has lost its ability to articulate an ideology of union. Yet public opinion has not been converted to independence. Rather, most people favour deeper self-government, within a new Union. The European context is important, not because Scots are particularly pro-European, but because it lowers the threshold of independence.

Keywords:   Territorial management, Nation, Identity, Europe

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