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Aegina: Contexts for Choral Lyric PoetryMyth, History, and Identity in the Fifth Century BC$
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David Fearn

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546510

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546510.001.0001

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‘The Theārion of the Pythian One’: The Aeginetan Theāroi in Context

‘The Theārion of the Pythian One’: The Aeginetan Theāroi in Context

Chapter:
(p.114) 3 ‘The Theārion of the Pythian One’: The Aeginetan Theāroi in Context
Source:
Aegina: Contexts for Choral Lyric Poetry
Author(s):

Ian Rutherford (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546510.003.0004

The ‘Theārion of the Pythian one’ referred to in Pindar's Nemean 3 has emerged in recent scholarship as a central focus of debate in Aeginetan studies. There is general agreement that this must have been the meeting place for Aeginetan theāroi, one of whose principal functions was liaising with Delphi. This chapter discusses the significance of this building and its officials for the religious and political life of the polis, through an assessment of comparative evidence from other states, including inscriptions. On Aegina at least, it is suggested that the role of being a theōros had two components: inside the polis, that of being an administrative magistrate; outside the polis, that of representing one's city in sacred delegations to extraterritorial sanctuaries.

Keywords:   Aegina, Aeginetan theâroi, Theārion, Theārion, Apollo, inscriptions, Pindar

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