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South African Economic Policy under Democracy$
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Janine Aron, Brian Kahn, and Geeta Kingdon

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199551460

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199551460.001.0001

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A Long‐run Perspective on Contemporary Poverty and Inequality Dynamics

A Long‐run Perspective on Contemporary Poverty and Inequality Dynamics

Chapter:
(p.270) 10 A Long‐run Perspective on Contemporary Poverty and Inequality Dynamics
Source:
South African Economic Policy under Democracy
Author(s):

Murray Leibbrandt

Ingrid Woolard

Christopher Woolard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199551460.003.0010

This chapter describes inequality and poverty trends in South Africa over the long run. In an attempt to provide an integrated review of apartheid and post-apartheid inequality trends, Section 2 uses census data to provide an empirical summary of inequality trends from 1970 to 2001. Section 3 updates this review through to 2006 by summarizing some of the recent debates around measured changes in poverty and inequality over the last decade. Section 4 presents and discusses a set of inequality decompositions by income source. This provides the backdrop for more detailed discussions of the performance of the post-apartheid labour market in Section 5 and the role of social grants in Section 6. Section 7 briefly summarizes the major points from the preceding sections and concludes by exploring implications of this empirical analysis for inequality and poverty going forward.

Keywords:   South Africa, post-apartheid inequality, poverty trends, inequality decompositions, social grants

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