Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Children's Palliative Care in Africa$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Justin Amery

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199567966

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199567966.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 June 2021

Psychosocial and family care

Psychosocial and family care

Chapter:
(p.227) Chapter 13 Psychosocial and family care
Source:
Children's Palliative Care in Africa
Author(s):

Justin Amery

Nkosazana Ngidi

Caroline Rose

Collette Cunningham

Carla Horne

Linda Ganca

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199567966.003.0013

Children are members of numerous social groups: families, clans, tribes, schools, and communities. To understand the effects of life-limiting illnesses on children, one needs to understand the interplay of all of these. In early childhood, a child has little concept of himself or herself as separate from the mother or family. The story of childhood can be seen as a story of separation from family and integration into a wider society. Children can express this psychological stress in different ways and can be helped to manage it in different ways. Families are systems and individual children are parts of those systems. Families are usually resilient and have unique systems for coping with stresses. In a similar way, communities have personalities, strengths, and weaknesses.

Keywords:   family theory, tribes, communities, psychological stress, childhood

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .