Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Political Theory of Political ThinkingThe Anatomy of a Practice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Freeden

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199568031

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199568031.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 September 2021

The Scramble for Acceptance: Mobilizing and Withholding Support

The Scramble for Acceptance: Mobilizing and Withholding Support

Chapter:
(p.166) 5 The Scramble for Acceptance: Mobilizing and Withholding Support
Source:
The Political Theory of Political Thinking
Author(s):

Michael Freeden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199568031.003.0006

Verbal support, oral and written, is one of the main fuels that keep a political system going, and its withdrawal is a threat to its existence or at least proper functioning. Theorizing about support for collectivities has declined in recent decades, yet it is a characteristic feature of thinking politically. The chapter investigates and criticizes the excessive focus of political theorists on political obligation, which in fact does not deliver the most typical forms of support. Instead, allegiance, loyalty, commitment, and trust are examined as alternative, often more pertinent, flows of support towards a political entity. Dissent and contention are explored as well. The chapter looks at the governmental eliciting of support through pledges and oaths. Finally a vernacular example of withdrawing support is considered through the Greenham Common protests of the 1980s, and one of competitively rendering support is discussed through the war dead rituals at Wootton Bassett.

Keywords:   support mobilization, political obligation, allegiance, loyalty, commitment, trust protest, rituals, vernacular

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .