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The Politics of Party FundingState Funding to Political Parties and Party Competition in Western Europe$
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Michael Koß

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199572755

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572755.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2021

Britain: A Growing Conflict between Party Goals and Societal Norms with (Still) No Consequences

Britain: A Growing Conflict between Party Goals and Societal Norms with (Still) No Consequences

Chapter:
(p.154) 9 Britain: A Growing Conflict between Party Goals and Societal Norms with (Still) No Consequences
Source:
The Politics of Party Funding
Author(s):

Michael Koß

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572755.003.0009

In Britain, neither the institutional context nor parties' strategic goals provided any incentives for cooperation in questions of party funding. In the centralized Westminster model of democracy, the opposition's view could only influence policy through commissions of enquiry without any veto power which – with one notable exception (the 1998 Neill Committee) – had no practical impact. The parties themselves had no strategic interest in cooperating in matters of their own funding; they chose to pursue vote-seeking strategies in line with the institutional environment, most notably majority rule. However, an ever more intense communicative discourse on political corruption – in which the public plays a more important role – recently facilitated a consensus on rudimentary state funding to political parties and continues to exert pressure for further reform of the British party funding regime.

Keywords:   Britain, commissions of enquiry, Neill Committee, majority rule, vote-seeking, communicative discourse, political corruption

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