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Epilepsy and Memory$
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Adam Zeman, Narinder Kapur, and Marilyn Jones-Gotman

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199580286

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580286.001.0001

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Memory assessment in intracarotid anaesthetic procedures: history and current status

Memory assessment in intracarotid anaesthetic procedures: history and current status

Chapter:
(p.189) Chapter 11 Memory assessment in intracarotid anaesthetic procedures: history and current status
Source:
Epilepsy and Memory
Author(s):

Gail L. Risse

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580286.003.0011

Intracarotid anesthetic procedures have played a major role in our understanding of memory function and dysfunction in patients with epilepsy over the past fifty years. From the earliest applications of the IAP as a measure of unilateral memory integrity, to its currently declining role in the face of noninvasive alternatives, the procedure has contributed to a vast body of literature addressing the nature and predictive value of preoperative memory performance in patients facing surgical resection of the mesial temporal lobe. This chapter describes the issues and controversies surrounding the procedure in its many variations and interpretations, and considers its continuing role in the context of rapidly advancing functional neuroimaging techniques. Understanding the historical complexities of the IAP will help define its legacy for future generations of neuroscientists.

Keywords:   amobarbital, Wada, memory, dominance, temporal lobectomy, hippocampus, outcome prediction, functional reserve, functional adequacy

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