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Reconfiguring Knowledge ProductionChanging Authority Relationships in the Sciences and their Consequences for Intellectual Innovation$
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Richard Whitley, Jochen Gläser, and Lars Engwall

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199590193

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590193.001.0001

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The Limits of Universality

The Limits of Universality

How Field‐Specific Epistemic Conditions Affect Authority Relations and their Consequences

Chapter:
(p.291) 10 The Limits of Universality
Source:
Reconfiguring Knowledge Production
Author(s):

Jochen Gläser

Stefan Lange

Grit Laudel

Uwe Schimank

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590193.003.0010

This chapter examines the ways in which differences between scientific fields affect the impact of changing authority relations on research goals and approaches. Comparing proximate and remote epistemic properties on research in six disciplines in the sciences and humanities, it shows how variations in resource dependence, research portfolio diversity, and other factors have impinged upon scientists' responses to resource scarcity and state restructuring in academic governance in Australia, as well as how these factors in turn reflect more deep-seated features of research styles, such as the role of personal interpretation in problem formulation, decomposability of research problems, and mode of access to empirical evidence.

Keywords:   authority relations, academic research, resource scarcity, academic governance, research problems, Australia

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