Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Governing by VirtueLord Burghley and the Management of Elizabethan England$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Norman Jones

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199593606

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593606.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2021

Managing War

Managing War

Chapter:
(p.170) 8 Managing War
Source:
Governing by Virtue
Author(s):

Norman Jones

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593606.003.0009

Defending the realm was a primary job of the monarch, and it fell to Burghley and the Privy Council to keep the nation in readiness for war, and to manage troops, ships, and supplies when they were needed in the conflicts in Ireland, the Low Countries, at sea, and on the Scottish border. Because mustering and equipping was the duty of local gentry, Burghley was constantly seeking ways to ensure that they would do their duty. Looking at the attempts to create trained bands in Yorkshire and at the encouragement of horse keeping for military purposes, this chapter points to the difficulties of using the antiquated defense system, and the resulting creation of a system of lord-lieutenants and trained bands that went some way toward giving England a more effective system of defense, commanded by loyal Protestants.

Keywords:   defense, trained bands, lord-lieutenant, musters, horse, guns, navy, militia, borders, abuse of apparel

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .