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Accounting for OneselfWorth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England$
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Alexandra Shepard

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199600793

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600793.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 March 2021

Refashioning Credibility

Refashioning Credibility

Chapter:
(p.277) 8 Refashioning Credibility
Source:
Accounting for Oneself
Author(s):

Alexandra Shepard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600793.003.0008

This chapter explores a broader set of changes that may have reshaped articulations of ‘worth’ and social identity from the later seventeenth century. Questions about witnesses’ worth diminished rapidly from this point, and the character of witnesses’ answers shifted as increasing proportions either chose not to respond at all or responded evasively—thereby deploying strategies that had once been the preserve of the gentry. The changing practices of self-evaluation in court are linked to the impact of civil war, to fiscal policy, to wider transitions in the culture of consumption, to the shifting bases of credit relations, to emergent concepts of privacy, and to the growing variation in forms of property. Goods became less primarily associated with savings and investment, and more bound up with processes of display. Knowledge of people’s ‘worth’ thereby became more partial and more dependent on assessments of the flow rather than stock of resources.

Keywords:   civil war, taxation, consumption, credit, privacy, savings

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