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Accounting for OneselfWorth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England$
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Alexandra Shepard

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199600793

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600793.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 01 March 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Reappraising the World of Goods

Chapter:
(p.303) Conclusion
Source:
Accounting for Oneself
Author(s):

Alexandra Shepard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600793.003.0009

This concluding chapter recapitulates the changes in early modern England that have been explored in the book. It concludes on their historiographical significance. It starts by asking two important questions. What did the social order of early modern England look like from below? How did ordinary men and women formulate their social position and judge that of others? A broad perspective on the idioms and strategies that informed social positioning in court and beyond can be gauged by what witnesses had to say for themselves. Interestingly, witnesses show us the importance of moveable property, in terms of people's good and chattels, for establishing graduations of status and dictating the tenor of social relations.

Keywords:   early modern England, social order, idioms, social positioning, witnesses, status

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