Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Going to the PalaisA Social And Cultural History of Dancing and Dance Halls in Britain, 1918–1960$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Nott

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199605194

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605194.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 March 2021

Youth and the Dance Hall, 1918–60

Youth and the Dance Hall, 1918–60

Chapter:
(p.134) (p.135) Chapter 5 Youth and the Dance Hall, 1918–60
Source:
Going to the Palais
Author(s):

James Nott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605194.003.0006

Chapter 5 concentrates on dancing and its impact on British society. It looks at the importance of dancing and dance halls to youth in the period 1918–60. The development of a separate youth culture in the post–Second World War period is of particular significance, and this chapter discusses the important role of the dance hall in youth culture. It also examines links between youth and dance before 1945 thus adding to the growing body of scholarship that sees the emergence of youth culture before the end of the Second World War and the Teddy Boy. The chapter examines how youth was deliberately targeted by the dance hall industry, and how young people made dancing their own, with teenagers adopting dances such as the Charleston, Jitterbug, and Jive. The important social functions that dancing and dance halls performed for young people, particularly in their transition to adulthood, are a key focus.

Keywords:   Teddy Boy, youth culture, teenager, Jive, Jitterbug, Charleston

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .