Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Religion, Intolerance, and ConflictA Scientific and Conceptual Investigation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steve Clarke, Russell Powell, and Julian Savulescu

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199640911

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199640911.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 June 2021

Religious Disagreement and Religious Accommodation

Religious Disagreement and Religious Accommodation

Chapter:
(p.180) 10 Religious Disagreement and Religious Accommodation
Source:
Religion, Intolerance, and Conflict
Author(s):

C. A. J. Coady

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199640911.003.0010

This chapter explores the issue of religious disagreement as a source of intolerance and civic danger. It challenges simplistic criticisms of religions due to some of the ‘New Atheists’. It clarifies the meaning of the term ‘religion’ and argues that religion is often unfairly blamed for violence and intolerant behaviour driven by other factors. Furthermore, it suggests that there is much violence and intolerance that is driven by purely secular ideologies. The chapter examines the interplay of religious and political ideas and institutions, showing how ideas of liberalism, freedom of conscience, and the separation of Church and State permeated mainstream Catholic thought in the twentieth century. The exclusion of religion from the public sphere is considered impractical and counterproductive, and a range of suggestions are developed to deal with religious disagreements and to promote compromise and tolerance.

Keywords:   religious disagreements, religious conflict, intolerance, civic danger, religion, violence, liberalism, freedom of conscience, secularism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .