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Religion, Intolerance, and ConflictA Scientific and Conceptual Investigation$
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Steve Clarke, Russell Powell, and Julian Savulescu

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199640911

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199640911.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 June 2021

Social-Psychological Aspects of Religion and Prejudice: Evidence from Survey and Experimental Research

Social-Psychological Aspects of Religion and Prejudice: Evidence from Survey and Experimental Research

Chapter:
(p.107) 6 Social-Psychological Aspects of Religion and Prejudice: Evidence from Survey and Experimental Research
Source:
Religion, Intolerance, and Conflict
Author(s):

Anna-Kaisa Newheiser

Miles Hewstone

Alberto Voci

Katharina Schmid

Andreas Zick

Beate Küpper

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199640911.003.0006

This chapter describes empirical work on the paradoxical association between religion and intolerance. It first provides a brief overview of seminal research that has formed the backbone of contemporary social psychological study of religion and prejudice. It then describes work on the relationship between religiosity and intolerance which conceptualized religion both as a ‘maker’ and an ‘unmaker’ of prejudice. Both large- and small-scale studies were conducted on contemporary religiosity and prejudice. The results from a cross-European nationally representative survey of ‘group-focused enmity’ are presented, which examined religiosity as a predictor of modern prejudice. The chapter then turns to the ‘unmaking’ of prejudice by religion, describing results from a line of experimental research on the anxiety-buffering, psychologically protective properties of religiosity. It concludes by reflecting on the significance religiosity continues to hold for contemporary intergroup relations.

Keywords:   religion, intolerance, prejudice, religiosity, maker, unmake, group-focused enmity, intergroup relations

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