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The Ethics of Information$
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Luciano Floridi

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199641321

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641321.001.0001

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The tragedy of the Good Will

The tragedy of the Good Will

Chapter:
(p.194) 10 The tragedy of the Good Will
Source:
The Ethics of Information
Author(s):

Luciano Floridi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641321.003.0010

In this chapter, I concentrate on information as a resource and product of ethical interactions, and do so by considering its semantic value. From a semantic perspective, information has played a major role in any moral theory at least since Socrates’ time. ICTs have now revolutionized the life of information, from its production and management to its consumption, thus deeply affecting our moral lives. Amid the many issues they have raised, a very serious one, discussed in this chapter, is what I have labelled as the tragedy of the Good Will. This is represented by the increasing pressure that ICTs and their deluge of information are putting on any responsible (in the technical sense seen in Chapter 7) agent who would like to act morally, when informed about actual or potential evils, as defined in Chapter 9, but who also lacks the resources to do much about them.

Keywords:   Good Will, tragic, scandalous, Cassandra’s predicament, Copenhagen consensus

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