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Blood of the ProvincesThe Roman Auxilia and the Making of Provincial Society from Augustus to the Severans$
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Ian Haynes

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199655342

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655342.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 October 2020

Armoury of the Bricoleur?

Armoury of the Bricoleur?

The Disparate Origins of Auxiliary Equipment

Chapter:
(p.238) (p.239) Chapter 15 Armoury of the Bricoleur?
Source:
Blood of the Provinces
Author(s):

Ian Haynes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655342.003.0015

Recent scholarship has usefully applied Lévi-Strauss’ bricolage metaphor to examine the way in which new forms of ‘Roman’ identity emerged through the incorporation of pre-existing elements. This understanding corresponds closely to the processes of evolution described by Arrian in his celebrated Ars Tactica, an account of the manoeuvres and dress of Roman cavalrymen. This chapter considers the processes, bricolage included, which characterized the adoption of particular forms of dress by auxiliaries and Rome’s armies more generally. It argues that an understanding of these dynamics is not only an essential preliminary for the study of material culture in Rome’s armies but also important when examining the processes of incorporation that created provincial society.

Keywords:   bricolage, Ars Tactica, Hippika Gymnasia, Warrior of Vachères, mail armour, spatha, innovation, uniformity, Antonine Revolution, missile weapons

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