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The Aesthetics of LossGerman Women's Art of the First World War$
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Claudia Siebrecht

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199656684

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199656684.001.0001

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Resurrection, Rebirth, and the Limits of Sacrificial Ideology

Resurrection, Rebirth, and the Limits of Sacrificial Ideology

Chapter:
(p.130) 5 Resurrection, Rebirth, and the Limits of Sacrificial Ideology
Source:
The Aesthetics of Loss
Author(s):

Claudia Siebrecht

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199656684.003.0006

Over the course of what would become the last year of the conflict, and into the immediate post-war period, female artists increasingly sought to endow the enormous cost of the war with meaning. As this chapter will show, the various thematic avenues pursued by the artists in their work highlight the difficult and inconclusive nature of this creative endeavour. A key motif in women's art of this period was the religious interpretation of wartime sacrifice in which the Passion of Christ was recast as the Passion of the soldier. Traditional religious iconography was frequently juxtaposed with secular images of the Resurrection as female artists produced numerous portrayals of pregnant war widows.

Keywords:   religious iconography, sacrifice, disabled veterans, war widows, pregnancy, social deprivation

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