Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Life Course Approach to Mental Disorders$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Karestan C. Koenen, Sasha Rudenstine, Ezra Susser, and Sandro Galea

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199657018

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199657018.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 July 2021

Measurement issues in epidemiology of psychiatric disorders

Measurement issues in epidemiology of psychiatric disorders

Chapter:
(p.26) Chapter 3 Measurement issues in epidemiology of psychiatric disorders
Source:
A Life Course Approach to Mental Disorders
Author(s):

Patricia Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199657018.003.0003

This chapter reviews measurement issues related to life course epidemiology. Issues include thinking through questions to be addressed and potential sources of information including and beyond that to be obtained from cohort members, family, friends, and/or official records. Established interview assessments of psychiatric disorders cover a range of ages, inclusion of many disorders or, sometimes, only those most prevalent. Some longitudinal studies examine the extended course of a particular disorder based on clinical samples. Others, more broadly, focus on general or high risk populations. Measure planning begins by reviewing the broad areas in which data have already suggested risks related to the targeted psychiatric disorders or symptoms. The potential domains of relevant measures are discussed, including measure selection, sequence, and administration issues. Critical measurement issues of reliability and validity are briefly introduced.

Keywords:   measurement, reliability, validity, diagnosis, study design, Children in the Community Study

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .