Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Primate Ecology and Conservation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eleanor Sterling, Nora Bynum, and Mary Blair

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199659449

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199659449.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 September 2021

Social and spatial relationships between primate groups

Social and spatial relationships between primate groups

Chapter:
(p.151) 9 Social and spatial relationships between primate groups
Source:
Primate Ecology and Conservation
Author(s):

Michelle Brown

Margaret Crofoot

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199659449.003.0009

Studying relationships among primate social groups poses a number of logistical challenges: encounters between groups occur relatively infrequently, interactions are often fast-paced and hectic and, unless all the social groups in a study area are habituated, the presence of human observers may have a significant impact on the outcome of intergroup conflicts. This chapter encourages a more focused approach to the study of intergroup interactions by detailing methods that researchers can use to facilitate inter-specific and inter-site comparisons. It begins by clarifying some of the terms commonly used to describe intergroup relationships, followed by a discussion of observational and experimental methods used to study interactions between primate social groups, and a review of methods for analyzing the impact of intergroup interactions on ranging patterns and space use. It concludes with a brief outline of some important avenues for future research.

Keywords:   intergroup interactions, spatial relationships, ranging patterns, intergroup relationships, intergroup conflicts, experimental methods, social groups, space use

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .